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It’s Just A Pink Cake…Right?

 

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21 May, 2010

Have you ever – in your life – seen such a cool birthday cake? Doesn’t it just make you smile from ear to ear? If not, imagine a cool super hero with a cape and mask.

Okay, I admit it – if someone had suggested that I buy MY daughter a Pink Barbie Birthday Cake when she was 6, I would have been insulted and indignant. I would have protested that the very fabric of feminism was in jeopardy and that I would not be a part of it.

I didn’t know then, what I know now. As the mom of 3 daughters who are now all young women, I know that one Pink Barbie Birthday Cake does not have the power to influence their ideas about being female as much as I might have believed. In fact, over the years, I have come to realize that there are other factors which influence the way our children view themselves in terms of gender identification that are more powerful and influential than media images and peer pressure.

1. Honest Conversation – Frankly, it can be difficult to talk with kids about gender identification in a world that spends billions of dollars a year trying to define it for us. That’s why it’s important to start the conversation with kids about the world around them when they are still young and before gender has any real meaning to them. Starting the conversation when they are young, will make it easier to navigate through the more difficult discussions that are bound to come up. Tackling issues like discrimination, exploitation, and sexism is essential if our children are to process the information being thrown at them through music, media and pop culture with some level of discernment. Allowing children to express their views, preferences and desires (without editorializing) allows our kids an opportunity to explore, accept, or discard what they are being exposed too.

Without honest conversation, children are left with either the media or their peers to help them navigate this tricky aspect of growing up. Make sure that the conversations have a “curious” tone to them. This will encourage kids to share more deeply what they think, how they feel, and how they make decisions.

2. Exposure – I believe that education and exposure go hand in hand in this area. When kids are educated about what they are being exposed too, they tend to make better decisions than when they are merely exposed to an idea or point of view and then left to interpret that information without guidance. And let’s face it, you might not bring home the Barbie Birthday Cake, but just turn on the TV or radio and your kids will be exposed to the media’s ideas of gender. Education in this area is key to keeping an open and honest conversation going for years.

Exposing kids to “real” people who may break the stereotypical molds helps give our kids a broader perspective of what it means to be male or female. As a mom, I made sure that for every lousy ad on TV depicting women or men in one kind of role, I introduced my children to “real” men and women who could offer another perspective on life. These relationships turned out to be some of the most important and influential in my kids’ lives. These individuals brought credibility and could challenge the media perspective with an authority that I didn’t necessarily have. In other words, leverage the people in your life who have challenge gender stereotyping.

3. Encouragement – We say we want our children to be their “authentic” selves and yet we limit their ability to choose because we are afraid of what they might choose. Encouraging our children to listen to their internal voice and honoring what they like and don’t like, is far more important than keeping “pink and blue” out of the equation. Encouraging self discovery allows our children to talk to us openly about how they view themselves, what their preferences are and how they want to express themselves to the outside world. Encouraging our children to decide for themselves who they are and how they choose to express that means taking a step back and trusting that our kids have the ability to wade through the crap and find essence of who they are.

4. Flexibility – As parents, staying flexible is a pre-requisite for raising children. We know that our kids will change their minds thousands of times in the course of their life. At one point your daughter wants pink, pink and more pink and a year later, she wants soccer balls and lax sticks lining the room. Your son wants baseballs, bats and helmets and two years later he is asking for oil paints and a canvas. Staying flexible and supporting our children as they discover for themselves who they are, is a sure way to support an independent, thoughtful, grounded young person who isn’t likely to be as influenced by the media or their peer group as a child who has been sheltered from all the options available to them.

The next time your son or daughter asks for a pink birthday cake, or a super hero outfit, try to look past the stereotyping and create an environment rich in opportunities for your children to discover for themselves who they choose to be.

5 Comments
  1. Debby says:

    My son just brought home a great book called “Pinky and Rex and the Bully” – Pinky is a boy who loves pink and the bully torments him – he decides to be called Billy and gives away his pink stuffed animals – but ultimately he learns to be proud of who he is and he stands up to the bully and reclaims his identity. This one really resonated for our family since my son has a lot in common with Pinky (including the tomboy best friend like Rex). Also heard a great story on The Moth podcast about a boy who loves pink and his dad’s efforts to be supportive despite his own discomfort. Although my own kids contradict gender stereotypes, they still believe them! We need to point out repeatedly how real life proves these categories are false, how different all people can be. I wrote a bit about this a while ago: http://thetransformationsnowball.blogspot.com/2010/04/boys-like-fighting.html

  2. Katie says:

    Hey Vicki~
    What timing you have. This is the exact cake my daughter wants for her 5th birthday this week 🙂 Guess what– I was struggling a little bit with it. So thank you.

    ~Katie

  3. Megan Kajitani says:

    Amen, Vicki!!! Good for you for taking this on, and I totally support your viewpoint on this! After four years in grad school studying media & culture (with an emphasis on gender, race and class), I can tell you this is the same perspective I now hold about gender roles, kids, media, etc. Let’s keep talking about it, everyone!

  4. Megan Kajitani says:

    Oh, and P.S. , even as the daughter of a 60’s feminist, I also had almost this exact cake one year (with generic doll, but same idea) — and look at me now! 🙂

  5. Vicki says:

    Thanks all. It’s so fun to read what others are thinking and if this conversation is still relevant. Obviously it is.

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